Electives

Visual Arts (I, II, III, IV)

Visual Arts covers all aspects of visual arts from the beginning level to advanced. Visual Arts is a choice-based class model that works toward Teaching Artistic Behaviors (TAB). Beginning students are instructed in the basics of design and materials, then after showing understanding, will design and pursue works of artistic expression of their choosing. They receive mentoring and guidance from the teacher as they work through visual projects based on their interest and research. Advanced students will use previous knowledge, new skills (acquired through workshop and mini-lessons), research and inspiration to plan and execute works that exhibit artistic behaviors and thought. Throughout, art production, history, critique, and aesthetic judgment are practiced with each project. These are production classes and students will complete work in the classroom environment unless specifically assigned to take home. Rubrics and due dates are specific to student projects and may vary. Students will maintain a digital portfolio of all work/statements and artwork will remain on campus until released to take home


Broadcasting (I, II, III, IV)

In this course students will learn the basic ins and outs of: Live Sound, Video Streaming, Basic Video Editing, and DAWs and Recording. This will include topics such as live mixing, sound design, and podcasts.


Introduction to Culinary Arts

In this introduction to the culinary arts, students will learn the skills to form a basic knowledge of the field. Skills that will be covered include basic nutrition, kitchen safety, and sanitation, knowledge of kitchen equipment and tools, basic culinary measurement and math skills, knife skills, how to follow a recipe, basic cooking methods, basic baking, table setting, and etiquette. At the end of this course, students will have the skills to successfully and safely complete a simple to a moderately complicated recipe. Students will be evaluated by participation, written assessments, and hands-on skills tests. The focus will be on safety, sanitation, teamwork, and creativity.


Culinary Arts I & II

Culinary Arts I and II will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Introduction to Culinary Arts. At the end of the course, students will be able to pick, properly plan, safely prepare, and serve moderately complicated and difficult recipes. Skills that will be reviewed include nutrition, kitchen safety and sanitation, use of kitchen equipment and tools, use of standardized recipes, moist and dry cooking methods, and baking. Additional skills include culinary math, kitchen timelines and task lists, sensory perception tasting, grocery list creation, menu design, presentation, event planning, and serving others. Students will also have the opportunity to act as executive chefs and lead a group of less experienced students to prepare a recipe. Students will be evaluated by participation, written assessments, projects, and skills tests. The focus will be on safety, sanitation, teamwork, and creativity.


Food For Life

Food for Life is a student-driven class that builds on skills acquired in Culinary Arts I and II, students will select recipes they would like to prepare. After the selection of the recipe, each student will break the recipe down into tasks, determine when those tasks will need to be completed, research any techniques unfamiliar to the student, create a grocery list for the recipe, and finally prepare the recipe. After recipe preparation, students reflect on the success of the recipe and evaluate their performance. In addition, students in this class will develop kitchen leadership skills through teaching skills to and acting as a mentor/team leader to students in Culinary Arts I and II. As a cumulative demonstration of skills acquired in Culinary Arts I and II, students will design a menu for a restaurant and lead a kitchen team to prepare and serve a meal to a group of guests. Throughout the year, students will be evaluated on the selection of recipe, planning and executing recipes as well as leadership skills in the kitchen using project-specific rubrics.


Theater Arts (I, II, III, IV)

The Theater Arts Course is a yearlong co-curricular course. As a co-curricular course, students have the opportunity to further their craft both within the school day as well as during after-school rehearsals and performances. Participation in rehearsals and performances outside of regular class hours is required for certain onstage and technical positions. Students will work in a workshop-type atmosphere in the classroom to engage in activities encompassing the onstage and technical aspects of theater at their level. Co-curricular time will be utilized to combine all theater arts classes to audition for onstage and technical roles to produce formal public and competition productions to utilize all in classwork. Fall semester theater arts students will be competing in Region 4A One-Act Competition as well as performances on campus for the public. In the Spring, there will be a full-length production. A snippet of this show will be a part of our annual Evening of the Arts, and the full production will be performed for the public as well.


Journalism (I, II, III, IV)

In Journalism, students will gain hands-on experience in the areas of beat coverage, advanced page layout and design, graphic design, reporting, and writing using the latest technology, photography, publishing, and staff management techniques.  Students will also use teamwork skills, organization skills, and personal responsibility. Journalism is an intensive, project-driven program of study that provides students with the skills, experience, and practice necessary to create the Tallulah Falls School yearbook and other school-based productions.


Music - Instrumental Ensemble (I, II, III, IV)

Instrumental Music class provides students an opportunity to develop music skills through a choice of instruments including piano, voice, recorder, percussion, strings, woodwinds, and brass. Students will study music theory as a class, yet practice privately to enhance music skills in a selected instrument.  Instrumental Music has a prerequisite of instructor approval and prior instrumental experience. Students may work in ensembles, but primarily individual practice. Printed music will be needed for guidance and evaluation.  In addition to a chosen instrument, students will enhance keyboard and vocal skills. With guidance, students will select their pieces for performances. Rehearsals may be called as needed to prepare for requested events, such as athletic events.  The students may represent the school with public performances and create added TFS spirit and school morale. Musicians who choose to excel may be selected to audition for GMEA All-State or GISA All-Select Chorus, Band or Orchestra.


Music - Advanced Chorus (I, II, III, IV)

TFS Singers is a year-long course and performing vocal ensemble that explores choral music from a wide variety of cultures and periods through study and performance. Students will increase their knowledge and personal skills in use of their vocal instrument, music theory, sight-reading, ear training, performance, and team building. Participation in rehearsals and concert performances outside of regular class hours is required. Chorus is a performing group that presents concerts for the school and community throughout the school year.


Music - Advanced Keyboard Techniques (I, II, III, IV)

The advanced piano class provides students an opportunity to develop music skills through performing, to further develop good technique, to continue learning music theory and sight-reading, and to enjoy self-expression through playing.  Students work as a group and individually. The course includes music theory and vocabulary, major and minor scales, arpeggios and cadences, repertoire, and performing opportunities publicly and within the class. Advanced Piano has a prerequisite of instructor approval and Piano I or one year private piano lessons.


Music - Beginning Instrumental Ensemble (I, II, III, IV)

This course is designed to teach students the basics of using a variety of instruments and techniques. Students can be at a variety of levels of ability and knowledge with these instruments. Students may work in ensembles, but primarily individual practice. Printed music will be needed for guidance and evaluation. In addition to a chosen instrument, students will enhance keyboard and vocal skills. With guidance, students will select their pieces for performances. Rehearsals may be called as needed to prepare for requested events, such as athletic events. The students may represent the school with public performances and create added TFS spirit and school morale. Musicians who choose to excel may be selected to audition for GMEA All-State or GISA All-Select Chorus, Band or Orchestra.


Entrepreneurship

This course is designed to teach the student the fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Students will learn the basics of starting a small business, financial stewardship, and business ethics. Students will create their own view of work and develop a mindset that can be applied to any pursuit in life. The goal of this course is to help students tangibly see how one can simplify a seemingly complex pursuit into easily manageable pieces and build confidence through daily progress towards a goal. Additionally, the student will be more equipped in regards to finances, drive, and stewardship that will assist them in any given career path. 


Foundation of Engineering

Engineering scope, content, and professional practices are presented through practical applications. Students, in engineering teams, apply technology, science, and mathematics concepts and skills to solve engineering design problems and innovate designs. Students research, develop, test, and analyze engineering designs using criteria such as design effectiveness, public safety, human factors, and ethics. This course is an essential experience for students who are interested in technology, innovation, design, and engineering.  Students will explore electrical circuits, CAD programs, and basic mechanical engineering.


Engineering Concepts

This is a fundamental course that provides a project-based learning approach to understanding the principles and concepts of physics and associated mathematics for most engineering technology programs. Students explore various careers and disciplines of engineering, problem-solving and core technology such as, but not limited to, manufacturing, power/energy/transportation, robotics, hydraulics, electricity/electronics, communications, construction systems, alternative energy, and computer-aided design. Students in engineering teams apply technology skills to solve engineering design problems and create innovative designs. Students research, develop, test, and analyze engineering designs using criteria such as design effectiveness, public safety, human factors, and ethics. Students utilize CAD and physical and virtual modeling concepts to construct, test and collect and report data.


Engineering Applications

The objective of this course is for students to explore the field of robotic design using a variety of hands-on activities, engineering, and technology. The course will consist of lectures, including principles of engineering, physics, electronics, mechanics, and computer programming. Laboratory experiments will require students to build simple robots to demonstrate these principles. Students will begin the semester with an introduction to the tools used to create robotic devices, focusing on mobile robots, illustrations of current state-of-the-art research, and applications. Course information will be tied to lab experiments; students will work in teams to build and test increasingly more complex robots, culminating in an end-of-semester robot contest. CAD application and 3D printing will be introduced as a tool used for mechanical design. Students then move onto autonomous navigation, where the robot is controlled entirely through programming. Mechanical concepts such as gearing/torque/speed/power are introduced. Students must use this knowledge to design and build custom drive trains capable of meeting a variety of criteria, including climbing, pushing, attaining maximum speed, etc. Sensors are introduced to allow robotic devices to interact with the environment. The last month of the lab will be spent applying the learned material to a final project, in which the students will design and build a robot for a final competition.


Advanced Engineering AC/DC

AC/DC Engineering focuses on the basic electricity principles of alternating current/direct current (AC/DC) circuits. Students will demonstrate knowledge and applications of circuits, electronic measurement, electronic implementation, voltage, current, and circuitry; apply Ohm's law to electrical calculations; use test equipment to measure continuity, voltage, and current values; and use electrical safety practices. Through the use of the design process, students will transfer academic skills to component designs in a project-based environment. Students will use a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Additionally, students will explore career opportunities, employer expectations, and educational needs in electronics. Students will learn the proper use of test equipment, A/C and D/C circuits, and component theory and operation.


Coding

This class is designed to help you learn the language of PYTHON, to be able to have a moderate skill level of coding, to become self-reliant of your knowledge, and to learn skills that will help you get a job/career in coding if you choose to one day


Honors Psychology

An introduction to the broad field of psychology including diverse topics such as learning, perception, motivation, emotion, consciousness, intelligence, and abnormal psychology as well as the adaptation of the individual to the social environment.


SAT/ACT Prep

The SAT/ACT Prep course is designed to familiarize students with the format and the content of the SAT and ACT tests taken for college entrance purposes. Through lectures, discussion, and interactive use of problems both individually and collaboratively, students will become better prepared for the tests and improve their probability for success on these competitive college admissions exams. The initial assessment will be based upon previously taken exams—the PSAT, ACT, or SAT, and an individual study plan will be developed through the College Board. Students will work interactively with released SAT/ACT tests and practice questions as well as vocabulary and mathematical concepts. Student weaknesses will be identified and analyzed, and efforts will be focused on improving those deficiencies. The course will be structured over a semester, with one nine-week segment devoted to English and the second nine-week segment devoted to math.


Senior Capstone

At Tallulah Falls School our seniors complete a culminating project of academic and intellectual experiences known as the Senior Capstone. Throughout this year-long course, students will defend a research topic, complete job shadowing/professional interviews and service hours, collect letters of recommendation, and complete a job application. In addition, seniors practice valuable life skills like interviewing, managing finances, professional greetings and dress, and other valuable lessons to prepare them for the college and professional worlds. By the end of the year, seniors will present their research and experiences to their peers, teachers, and evaluators. The Senior Capstone is a graduation requirement at TFS worth one full credit. Students will also receive guidance and time in this class period to work on college and scholarship applications, research careers, meet with the college counselor, and hear college representative presentations. 


Outdoor Education

This is a one semester physical education elective that is designed to give all learners the opportunity for exercise in the great outdoors. Outdoor Education promotes fitness for life as well as an appreciation and personal responsibility for nature and outdoor activities. Topics of study include Kayaking, Paddle boarding, Hiking, Fishing, Biking, Orienteering, Geocaching, and Outdoor games.


Health

Health is a one-semester course that uses a skill-based approach to help students develop the skills, attitudes, and functional knowledge needed to lead a healthy lifestyle. The goal of health education is to help students to become health-literate people that can address their own health needs along with the needs of others. They are able to obtain and apply knowledge and skills to enhance their own health and the health of others both now and in the future as their needs change throughout their lives. The purpose of this course is to present factual and current information allowing each student to develop personal responsibility for optimal health.


Strength and Conditioning

Upon completion of Strength & Conditioning, students should be able to demonstrate respect for equipment, apply safety principles associated in lifting weights and exercising, create and/or follow basic program design according to desired goals, and improve in varied, measurable biomotor components.


Lifetime Activities

This is a One Semester Course. This class is for individuals that want to learn to be active in life through individual or small group activities. These are activities that can be continued throughout their entire lives. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a wide range of indoor and outdoor fun! Topics include Kayaking and Paddle Board, Biking, Hiking/Walking/Running, Disc Golf, Ultimate Frisbee, Yard Games, Tennis and Pickleball, Badminton, Basketball, Bowling, Golf, Table Tennis and Hantis, Stretching and more.


Yoga

This is a one semester physical education elective that is designed to teach students the basic poses and principles of yoga in order to encourage lifelong fitness. Also included in this course will be activities related to stress management, mindfulness, balance, flexibility, self-awareness, and more! 


Health Occupations

This is a one semester course that is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training.